Some healing remedies for Sydney

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The last week has been a little bit of a roller coaster with the fun of Christmas parties and the tragedy of the siege in Martin Place in Sydney. I thought I was coping okay on Monday mainly because I was thinking that my family was fine. My daughter was at UTS so no where near where it was happening, except when I realised she was at Chatswood I burst into tears. Turns out her Uni had been on security lockdown all day and then made a decision to finish her summer school classes early and send people home early. Good to know that they had a plan and reacted effectively but also concerning that we live in a world where we need one.

So my mind turned to what homeopathic medicines might be useful at this time. Such a mix of emotions to consider as this crisis has brought up fear, anxiety, relief and tears.

One of the first remedies to think about is Aconite which is good for the shock of the shock. The easiest way to explain it is thinking about a car accident. If you keep remembering the shock of the impact you are stuck in the shock of the shock. Symptoms are sudden and intense and may follow a shock such as an accident or natural disaster. Typically you may feel agitated, restless, and fearful. Other symptoms may include: dry skin and mouth; thirst; pounding heart. Aconite can also treat ongoing anxiety caused by a past  or recent traumatic event.

Arsenicum is a good homeopathic medicine if you feel anxious about security and safety and what might happen in the future. You often tend to worry about health or money. To manage this anxiety, you can become overly fastidious or perfectionist.  You feel better in company but can be a little controlling in behaviour. Usually people who need Arsenicum are overly neat and tidy, chilly and better for warmth.

Ignatia is helpful if you are very teary and can’t stop crying. Often you tend to be the sort of person who loses their appetite when upset and feel as though you have a lump in your throat.

A couple of other options are Bach’s Rescue Remedy which is lovely and calming. The best thing about rescue remedy is you can take it frequently – the recommended dose is four drops four times a day but during a period of significant stress more often is fine.

Also consider changing stimulants such as coffee for something more calming like chamomile or peppermint tea, which is less likely to leave you feeling jittery and upset.

Talking about your feelings with a good friend is helpful. This week I have had a few conversations with people around how they felt about what happened and most of the time people were overwhelmed by the positivity of the social media responses.If that isn’t possible try writing about what you are feeling. Writing it down can really help release stuck feelings and emotions. Many Sydney siders have queued in Martin Place to leave flowers and notes of support, a great way to express their support and concern.

Perhaps find a way to express your gratitude that your family are safe . My version was to track where my daughter was in Chatswood using my find a friend app on our phones and then help her shop at Vinnies for dressups, but at least we were together.

Hope you and your family are safe and well over the Christmas break.

Back to grassroots

bigstock_homeopathy_7963486Spending a weekend in Hobart for a homeopathic conference is a good way to really focus on your practice. You query whether there is a better or faster way to get people well. Is someone else going to give you a gem that makes homeopathy crystal clear and straightforward? Well like a lot of homeopathic practice there were a few insights but I still feel I need to do more work and study.

Dr Joe Kellerstein, the keynote speaker, pvovided a good structure for case taking with his four quadrant approach. Reassuringly I recognised most of the key areas and took out of it some useful ways to drill up or down with questioning.

For perhaps the first time at a conference I also quickly recognised the homeopathic medicines presented. Now it was fairly easy with the Solomon Island’s homeopathy by numbers however identifying a homeopathic medicine I rarely use in a complex case was a bit more exciting.

The other aspect of any conference which is always useful is catching up with colleagues, particularly interstate ones who I haven’t seen since the last conference. The last night a few of us headed down to the Lark Distillery for a whiskey tasting and a great seafood meal at The Drunken Admiral. This was a real highlight for me as like so many small business people homeopaths are often isolated and it is good to be reminded that you have a “tribe” .

Usually with courses I am happy if I get one or two useful things which improve my practice. So what did this conference give me? I guess reassurance that I was on track with my case taking and remedy knowledge and perhaps a reminder to reconnect with my homeopathic roots a little more often.

Water Medicine in the Solomons

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At the 2014 Australian Homeopathic Medicine Conference in Hobart, Jane Lindsay, a Queensland homeopath, shared her experiences in the Solomon Island’s. Homeopathy was originally brought out by the missionaries from the South Sea Evangelical Church as a way of looking after their own health and that of their congregations over a hundred years ago. Today is is prescribed by 150 dispensers as a primary form of health care for over 60,000 people in the Solomon’s. They use a simple numbering system as the common language is a form of Pidgin English. Symptoms can include such gems as “Belly Stop” and “Belly Run”.

The homeopathic medicines are numbered and the dispensers have simple symptom descriptions to decide which medicine is appropriate. Originally starting with 36 remedies now it has expanded to 51 as changes in the population’s diet and the introduction of vaccines has created the need for additional homeopathic medicines. (Jane also shared that they would love any materia medica’s that were no longer needed as they don’t have access to a lot of books)

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I really resonated with the idea of a simple number of medicines as I am always surprised by how many clients, once they do my first aid workshop, are able to successfully treat a range of illnesses and injuries. My favourite story was a client who travelled to Israel with her small first aid kit and treated her family’s headaches, PMS and stomach upsets.

This system seems to work reasonably well and it really brings into question for me why as homeopaths we seem to have so many medicines (I have over 600 in my own dispensary!!). I really think we might be better off focusing on a smaller group of better understood medicines rather than trying to choose own of the 1000 in our books. Are we over complicating it for ourselves as homeopaths and making it harder to practice?

So what do you think?