What are the best vegetables for feeding your gut ?

Eating six serves of vegetables a day is a good way to feed your microbiome but are there better choices ? Actually it depends on what is going on with your gut so lets look at six different types of prebiotic fibres from vegetables. They all have different roles so the activity should give you an idea of what may be helpful for you and then you can determine if you may need to increase your consumption of one of these groups.

Six types of prebiotic fibres are inulin, pectin, galactooligosaccharides (usually referred to as GOS) , arabinoxylan, resistant starch and proanthocyanidins.

Inulin is found in artichokes, asparagus, garlic, onions and leeks, bananas, grapefruit and peaches. Inulin as a prebiotic fibre decreases the desire for sweet and fatty food and increases the feeling of fullness after a meal. A small study reported by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed a 3.8 fold increase in the beneficial Bifidobacterium from consuming inulin for 3 weeks. (Vol 109, Iss 6, June 2019, pp1683-1695).

Pectin is found is peas, beans, carrots, potato, beetroot, tomato, eggplant, lentils and pumpkin as well as fruits such as banana, apples, berries, pears, apricots, lemons and kiwifruit. Increasing foods containing pectin is associated with an increase in the range of bacterial species in the gut as well as a specific increase in beneficial strains such as F praausnitzii which is anti-inflammatory. It is also considered a marker for good gut health.

Galactooligosaccharides (GOS) are found in most legumes such as green peas, lentils chickpeas and beans as well as nuts like hazelnuts, cashews and pistachio. GOS has a role in reducing IBS symptoms in particular bloating and flatulence and it also increases the level of beneficial bacteria. (2).

Arabinoxylan is found in almonds, bamboo shoots, brown and white rice, flaxseeds and sorghum. It is anti-inflammatory, reduces cholesterol and improves insulin sensitivity as well as increasing the beneficial levels of Bibfidobacterium Longum.

Resistant starch is found in most legumes as well as potato, sweet potatoes, taro, plantains, greenish bananas, sorghum and brown rice. The levels of resistant starch are also higher if root vegetables such as potato are allowed to cool and then served as a potato salad. Resistant starch is so called because it doesn’t get broken down in the small intestine but is partially broken down further in the bowels and serves as a useful food for bacteria in the large intestine. Its primary role seems to be to feed bacteria so they can produce butyrate. Butyrate is a useful fuel for the cells so it helps them stay healthy and resistant starch may also assist in the maintenance of healthy cholesterol.

Proanthocyanidins are found in almonds, pecans, hazelnuts peanuts, pistachios, pecans, cinnamon, sorghum, berries, cranberries and plums as well as dark chocolate. Proanthocyanidins have a number of health benefits due to their anti-oxidant status however the impact on the microbiome may also explain some of this benefit. These nutrients have an anti-microbial impact which may reduce problematic species such as helicobacter pylori (known for its role in causing gastric ulcers) and also through their prebiotic effect they increase beneficial bacteria such as Lactobacilli and Bifidobacterium (3)

Generally speaking ensuring you are eating a range of vegetables as well as a small serve of nuts and some berries may be the optimal approach for maintaining a healthy gut.

Christine Pope is a Naturopath and Nutritionist based at Elemental Health at St Ives. You can make appointments with her on (02) 8084 0081 or online at her website www.elementalhealth.net.au .

1. Prebiotics , Definitions, Types, Sources , Mechanisms and Clinical

applications. Accessed. at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6463098/

2. The effects of a trans-galactooligosaccharide on faecal microbiota and symptoms in IBS. Accessed at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19053980/https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19053980/

3. The Gastrointenstinal Tract as a key organ for the Health Promoting effects of Proanthocyanidins accessed at https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnut.2016.00057/full#h1

Therapeutic Juicing

Juicing is a useful way to increase nutrients in the diet and can also be used therapeutically. There are many foods which you can use with health benefits and a regular juice can be a good addition to your diet. It can also be a good way to get your three cups of vegetables daily. Here are three of my favourite combinations that you may find helpful.

Celery juice is known for its benefits in reducing fluid retention however what do you use if you can’t stand celery? My first juice is a delicious blend and can easily be adjusted for specific preferences. Key is the pineapple and cucumber. Papaya is also helpful for fluid retention (and improving digestion) but you can increase other ingredients to compensate if you don’t have papaya handy.

Fluid Retention

  • 1 cup chopped Pineapple
  • 1/2 Cucumber
  • 1 Apple (green or red)
  • 1/2 cup papaya
  • 1 cup green spinach

Pineapple is a good source of bromelain which is useful to reduce inflammation and fluid retention. If you don’t have papaya add a little more pineapple. If using organic food then you do not need to peel the cucumber or apple.

Place in the blender or juicer and blend until smooth. You may need to dilute a little with water.

This next juice is a good way to get an energy boost in the afternoon as well as generally increasing vegetable intake in the diet generally. I do like to add a little ginger but that may not appeal to everyone.

Energy Boost

  • 2 Carrots
  • 1 small beetroot
  • 2 stalks of celery
  • 2 Apples

Peel the carrots and beetroot and then juice with the celery and apples. A delicious addition is a small knob of ginger.

One of my favourite social media sites for new recipes is Simple Green Smoothies and they also provide great information on how to blend to make a good green smoothie. The basic recipe is as follows;

  • 1 cup leafy greens (spinach or kale)
  • 1 cup of liquid such as coconut water, nut milk or dairy
  • 1 cup of fruit (having it frozen makes it easier to store)

Blend the greens initially and then add liquid and mix through. Follow up with fruit and blend until smooth and creamy.

Do you have a favourite juice recipe please feel free to share in the comments below.

Christine Pope is a Naturopath and Nutritionist based at Elemental Health St Ives. You can make appointments on 8084 0081 or online at www.elementalhealth.net.au .

Winter warmers – soups

Salads can be a good way to increase the amount of vegetables in your diet but its not always an attractive option during the winter months. A better alternative can be soups. It is also a good way to incorporate bone broths for a little extra support for gut healing.

If you are using bone broth in your soups its a good idea to ensure that its the best quality possible. If you are making it yourself then try and use bones from free range or organic sources. The flavour profiles are usually better when animals are raised ethically. With a move to lean protein sources these items are often discarded or available at a lower cost. It is also preferable to spend a few extra dollars on an organic chicken and then reuse the bones to make broth. Frankly my best ever effort is usually from the free range turkey we have at Christmas, it usually produces 3-4 Litres of really good quality broth.

Another good tip if you are interested in making your own stock or broths is to keep and freeze the tops of carrots, onions and celery, when you are using them in recipes. You quickly have a small bag that can be added to your pot for another batch of bone broth.

Even though these are five of my workhorse soup recipes listed below I do recommend experimenting by googling any ingredients and soup recipe as it often results in some new favourites.

  1. Cauliflower Soup
  2. French Onion Soup
  3. Pumpkin and Ginger Soup
  4. Chicken and Corn Soup
  5. Asian Style Chicken Noodle

Cauliflower Soup

Many years ago my favourite version of this soup included 250ml of cream and a cup of grated cheese. This version is a lot lighter and still flavourful. You can easily substitute the chicken stock with vegetable stock if you prefer a vegetarian version.

  • 1 small cauliflower cut into florets
  • 1 leek
  • 1L of chicken stock
  • 1 tsp Salt
  • Olive Oil

Steam the cauliflower for 8-10 minutes until soft, strain and remove from heat. Meanwhile saute diced leek in olive oil on low heat for five minutes in a larg pot. Add steamed cauliflower, stock and salt to the pan and bring to the boil, then reduce to simmer for 10-15 minutes. Puree soup in a blender when cooled.

French Onion Soup

Many of us only remember the dried french onion soup that we used in a dip recipe however this version of french onion soup is a tasty option and really quite simple. For those of you who can eat dairy and gluten consider adding some slices of breadstick with melted cheese as a delicious extra.

  • 500g white onions sliced
  • 500ml dry white wine
  • 1 Tblespoon unsalted butter
  • 1.5 Litres of chicken stock

Simmer wine, onion and butter (use olive oil for a dairy free version) in a heavy bottomed pan uncovered for forty minutes. Its important to slowly simmer it to effectively caramelise the onions and really develop the flavours. Add chicken stock and heat for 5-10 minutes and then serve.

A couple of my favourite cafes usually offer soup during the winter months but I am always disappointed if they just put a boring pumpkin soup on the menu. Much prefer a hearty vegetable soup or something a little more complex. Asian soups such as Tom Yum, Laska or Pho are also a great option for something with a range of flavours that make a delicious Winter warmer.

Christine Pope is a naturopath and nutritionist based at Elemental Health at St Ives. She is available for consultations on Tuesdays and Wednesdays and can also offer online consultations via Zoom.

How to look after frequently washed hands

Frequent hand washing and use of hand sanitiser does seem to be doing an excellent job of reducing infection rates but it also come at a cost for many people’s skin.

So what are your options? Well conventional wisdom would suggest that moisturising is the solution however most creams really only provide a barrier. Its also not really practical to moisturise every time you wash your hands and it may remove some of the benefits.

Focussing on skin quality needs to be addressed from two perspectives topical and internal. Topical options can include lotions, creams, ointments or oils. There are advantages and disadvantages to each however first up make sure that the ingredients include water, glycerol and natural oils amongst the first five ingredients. Glycerol or glycerin is important to keep the moisture in the skin.

The major difference between each of these different types of cream is the water content. Lotions have a high percentage of water with a base that helps it emulisfy. Creams are a lower percentage of water, ointments much less and oils usually just contain an oil in an appropriate base. People with oilier skins benefit from lighter lotions or creams, however in the case of cracked dry skin ideally you need to start with a more dense cream or an ointment or oil.

For healing dry and cracked skin you want to choose a product that has a reasonable oil content as well as having therapeutic ingredients. Weleda make a range of creams based on Calendula and the research shows that at abou 0.9% content it can reduce redness and cracking. It will also assist in wound healing and can be invaluable in replacing the natural protective barriers in the skin. The only caution with Calendula topically would be if you are sensitive to the Asteracae plant family. To minimise the risk I would always recommend patch testing a small spot before widespread use.

Very dry skin might really benefit from the therapeutic use of plant oils such as Carrot or Sesame which are naturally high in Carotenoids and Vitamin E. The oil will assist in holding moisture in the skin and it would be ideal to use it at the end of the day to maximise the benefit.

The other critical aspect is the support of the skin membrane. Ideally you need to ensure that to repair good quality skin your diet is rich in essential fatty acids and you maintain water intake. Each cell is composed of a bi-layer of essential fatty acids and without adequate intake of fats its not possible to repair already damaged skin. Look at your diet including good quality fish, olive oil, coconut oil, avocado and nuts and seeds. If your skin is very dry chances are you are not consuming enough or you are not breaking it down effectively. People with low bile acids often have difficulty with absorbing fats and there are several ways to support digestion to address this.

Christine Pope is a Naturopath and Nutritionist based at Elemental Health at St Ives. Currently available in person at the clinic or by audiovisual means if you are self-isolating. You can make appointments on (02) 8084 0081 or online at the clinic website at www.elementalhealth.net.au .

Upskilling and recharging

Spending time at home gives you the opportunity to try things that you may have been wanting to try but may never had the time.  One of my goals is to meditate daily and work my way through all the webinars I signed up for but never got the time to watch. Below are a few ideas to keep you occupied over the next few weeks whilst nurturing mind, body & spirit.

Take an Online course

There are lots of online courses available to cater for every need. TAFE NSW is currently offering 21 courses free of charge.  These range from business administration through to e marketing and are aimed at upgrading skills and giving a qualification which can be used to get back into the workplace.  Further information can be found at Tafe NSW Fee Free Courses .

Coursera offers a range of courses from business and universities, some of which are free.  These are mainly IT and technology based.

Khan academy offers short videos on a range of subjects from mathematics, science through to history.  These are informative and very easy to follow.

Udemy also offers a wide range of short courses free of charge.

Exercise

Staying physically active is important not only for cardiovascular health but also for flexibility.  If you are not used to exercise, then it is important to start with postural exercise to prevent injury.  If you use Instagram then #Move U have some good stability demonstrations.  If you are looking for classes then the Les Mills app is great for classes ranging from Bodypump through to Bodyjam which is a dance type class. F45 in Mona Vale are live streaming HITT classes but do require a membership.  Conny Pulvermacher is livestreaming Yoga classes from The Yoga Room at St Ives have a look at the timetable and see what works for you.

Get Google Arts and Culture

Google arts and Culture, allows you to take virtual tours of some of the top museums, galleries and theatres of the world.  So whether you want to visit  the Natural History museum in London or the teatro bibiena then try Arts and Culture google.

Meditate

Life at the moment can leave many of us feeling stressed, anxious and overwhelmed not knowing what the future will bring.  Meditation and mindfulness apps can help aid in relieving some of these feelings.  Puregym gives a good summary of some of the more popular mindfulness apps. My personal favourite is Gaia which offers you the option to choose the length as well so I have a favourite 12 minute meditation.

Ferment

Fermented foods are great for gut health and general wellbeing, but can be quite expensive.  They include Kombucha, Sauerkraut, Kimchi, Kefir and a whole range more.  Each different type of ferment has a different array of friendly bacteria.  Once you get the hang of them they are very simple to create and quite addictive to make.  If you would like to know more then Holly Davis has written a beautiful book called Ferment.  She also has some beautiful recipes on her website .

Learn a language

There are a number of free online language courses available so if you have ever thought you would like to expand your lingual skills try these websites.

French http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/french/

Spanish http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/spanish/

Italian http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/italian/

Go to the Theatre

Whilst we can’t travel overseas one advantage of the current situation is that theatres are opening up production libraries to enable us to have the experience from the comfort of home. Time Out has produced a list of productions with streaming options in New York and London and Sadler Wells dance company is offering a range of shows free online as well .

Christine Pope is a naturopath and nutritionist based at Elemental Health at St Ives. You can make appointments for an online consultation currently but she will be back in her clinic at St Ives from 1 May.

Easter cooking gluten free.

This Easter weekend with so many of us stuck at home it could be a good time to try your hand at cooking a few new things themed around the holiday. For example fish pie for Good Friday which is usually a fasting day in Catholic households which translates as no meat. Saturday could be about some gluten free hot cross buns and Sunday might be time to get out the big guns with some gorgeous sides for the prawns and ham. Monday you will probably be living on leftovers but these easy banana muffins could be a nice addition to breakfast or afternoon tea.

The fish pie recipe is from Taste.com and uses almond milk in place of dairy. The gluten free hot cross bun recipe is from the Healthy Chef. Some healthy sides for Easter could include the following;

Roast vegetables with chili jam

  • 1 large sweet potato
  • 2 red and 2 yellow capsicum
  • 4 medium tomatoes
  • 2 large carrots
  • 2 medium zuchini

Slice vegetables thinly and halve tomatoes. Spray with olive oil and bake uncovered in hot oven 20 minutes. (200 C) Turn and cook for a further 10 minutes.

Chilli Jam

  • 1 medium onion chopped finely
  • 2 crushed garlic cloves
  • 4 large tomatoes seeded and chopped
  • 1/4 cup chopped basil
  • 1/2 cup red wine vinegar
  • 80ml dry sherry
  • 2 chilis seeded and chopped
  • 3/4 cup raw sugar

Combine ingredients in large pan and bring to boil. Reduce to a simmer for 30 minutes or until thickened, stirring occasionally. Serve with roast vegetables.

French beans provencale

  • 500 g green beans
  • olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 2 tsp parsley

Wash beans, top and tail. Steam until tender Meanwhile heat oil in saucepan , stir in garlic and parsley and a pinch of salt. Add beans and toss until well combined.

Warm Cherry Tomato Salad

  • Olive Oil
  • 2 Tablesp Honey
  • 1 Tblesp oregano, tarragon and basil
  • 1 sliced onion
  • 6 shallots
  • 2 punnets cherry tomatoes
  • Vinaigrette – 2 Tblesp Balsamic, 1 Tblesp Olive Oil and 1 tsp mustard.

Heat oil stir in honey and herbs. Add onion and brown stirring constantly.. Lower heat and add tomatoes and stir gently. Serve warm and sprinkle with vinaigrette and chopped basil.

Vinaigrette – combine oil and mustard and beat in balsamic vinegar.

Gluten Free Banana Muffins

  • 1 tsp vanilla essence (add to sugar)
  • 50 g butter
  • 3 mashed bananas
  • 1 1/2 cups gluten free self raising flour or 1 cup gluten free self raising flour plus 1/2 cup of almond meal or coconut flour (coconut gives it a nice moisture)
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cup choc chips preferably dairy free (or 1/2 cup frozen raspberries)
  • 1/2 cup sugar

Melt butter, mix in sugar and then egg. Add in alternately flour and bananas and stir well. Then add in the choc chips. Spoon mixture into 12 muffin cases or greased muffin tray. Cook 15-20 minutes at 180 Celsius. Muffins should be lightly browned when cooked.

Christine Pope is a naturopath and nutritionist who practices at Elemental Health at St Ives. Her favourite tool for finding new recipes is googling ingredients.

Meal Plan Week Two

Following on from the previous blog (Meal Plan Week One) I am documenting some healthy eating suggestions for my family as I am still not able to prepare food easily. Well I can prep some things but lifting and bending is still challenging post surgery.

This week’s meal plan included the following ideas;

Simple Potato Curry

One or two tablespoons curry paste ( two if you prefer it spicy),
1 tsp each cumin, mustard, ginger and garlic
One onion
2 potatoes
1 piece sweet potato or pumpkin or 2 carrots
2 red capsicum
1 eggplant
2 zucchini
1 can chopped tomatoes
1 can coconut milk
Add a little oil to the pan and a chopped onion plus the spices. Fry the onion in the spices. Add two potatoes, a quarter pumpkin, two red capsicum (scrub potatoes, don’t peel – less work and better for you). Cut all the vegetables about the same size – for instance, in quarters.

Chop and slice salted eggplant and two zucchini. (Before you use eggplant – slice it, pour salt on it and then after 10 minutes wash it off). Stir this through, add a can of chopped tomatoes, cover for 20 minutes, cook on low heat. Check that the potatoes are getting soft. Add a small can of coconut milk and simmer for a further 5 mins before serving.

Variations: add a bunch of spinach (chopped) or Chinese cabbage a few minutes before its finished cooking.Leftovers will make another meal with a tin of legumes or chickpeas added.

Chicken Caesar Salad

  • 300 g cooked chicken breast fillet
  • 2 panini diced (or 3-4 slices of gluten free bread)
  • 3 Tablespoons of Aoili
  • 1 Large Cos lettuce cut into bite size pieces
  • 4 slices of prosciutto
  • Grated parmesan (optional)

Lightly spray panini or bread cubes with olive oil. Brown in oven for 8-10 minutes at 180C. Allow to cool. Place prosciutto on a non stick tray or on baking paper and also cook until crisp, approx 7-10 minutes at 180C.

Place cos lettuce cut into bite size pieces in a large salad bowl and toss with Aoili until it is spread through the lettuce. Layer on cooked chicken, prosciutto and croutons and if desired grated parmesan.

Christine Pope is a naturopath and nutritionist who is based at Elemental Health St Ives. You can make appointments on 8084 0081 or online at http://www.elementalhealth.net.au .

Building Resilience

Every year in clinic I see people who are having a bad run of constant infections and having difficulty recovering. Its not uncommon for children to have up to seven viruses a year but its not good when they are getting sick more frequently than their peers and having more time off. Today I want to focus on what you can do to build your resilience to infections.

First up its important to consider the basics, diet, sleep and exercise. Then its critical to look at what nutrient deficiencies may need to be addressed and to consider how these infections are treated and whether there are supplements or homeopathics which may help with treatment.

What are the critical basics with a good diet? Well ideally one that is tailored to you and your specific requirements but also one based on the following essentials;

  1. Six serves of vegetables a day minimum (3 cups) ideally at least one of which is green leafy vegetables, one coloured and a third made up of brassica vegetables such as cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage and brussel sprouts.
  2. One to two pieces of fruit.
  3. Adequate amounts of protein equivalent to 1g per kilo per day for maintenance. For example a 70kg female needs 70g of protein a day which is equivalent to 2 eggs, a small piece of chicken and a can of tuna. If you are training you may need to increase your protein requirements to allow for building muscle mass.
  4. A small handful of nuts ,and seeds (approx 10 almonds) which provide good fats and key minerals such as zinc.
  5. Adequate amounts of carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread and other grains. At least a couple of serves a day is needed by most people.
  6. Adequate hydration in the form of 1.5-2.0L of water or herbal tea a day.

Dietary changes usually take 4-6 weeks to really start providing benefits so it can be good to look at a few key nutrients to support your immune system as well.

First up look at simple nutrients like Vitamin C and Zinc. Vitamin C ideally dosed at 500mg two to three times a day will give your immune system more support. Often when you are unwell you can also go higher with doses of up to 1 g three to four times a day to assist in fighting off a cold or flu. Zinc is a key nutrient that is often deficient in people who are frequently ill and may be helpful in doses of up to 25mg a day.

Probiotics are often recommended particularly for those who have had frequent courses of antibiotics. Increasingly now I am recommending prebiotic foods or specific prebiotics such as Partially Hydrolysed Guar Gum (a type of resistant starch from a bean). The prebiotics support a wide range of beneficial bacteria in the gut. This can often be more helpful than a few specific strains of probiotics.

If you do develop another cold or flu my favourite herb is Elderberry and the product, Sambucol, which is available in pharmacy as lozenges or capsules can be useful for assisting in recovery. There are also specific homeopathic remedies which can assist which are covered in my blog on Treating Colds and Flu. Based on this year’s strains the remedies which should be considered are Arsenicum for gastric type flus and also Gelsemium for a more traditional presentation with fever, fatigue and aches and pains.

If you get really stuck and you have cold and flu symptoms I am available to do Zoom consultations as well. You can book in at Elemental Health on (02) 8084 0081 or online.

Meal Plan Week One

Getting organised to have surgery I was confronted with the reality of a very small freezer compartment and the need to educate my family on the requirements for healthy meals to assist my recovery. My goal is to document my usual weekly meal plan to provide a list of instructions and I thought it was worth sharing as you may like to use some of the recipes.

First up I always like to bulk prepare a few options on a Sunday to make the week easier. The current favourite is my version of Lasagne which is gluten and dairy free however it can be Spaghetti Bolognaise one night and Lasagne the next night.

  1. Turkey Mince Bolognaise and Lasagne
  2. Lamb Chops and Roast Potato with stir fried broccolini
  3. Chicken and Cauliflower curry
  4. Mushroom and pea risotto
  5. Chicken noodle soup asian style

Turkey mince bolognaise

750g turkey mince
1 brown onion finely chopped
2 carrots peeled and diced and 1 large eggplant roasted
1 jar of passata (chopped tomatoes)
1 glass of red wine or (1/2 each wine and beef stock)
1 tsp chili (optional)
1 clove garlic crushed

Start by placing the eggplant in the oven at 180C for 45-50 minutes. Pierce it with a fork in a couple of places. In a little olive oil saute onions and carrots on a low heat for a few minutes until onions are soft. Add mince, continue cooking until mince is browned. Scoop out eggplant which should be soft and then add remaining ingredients and simmer for twenty to thirty minutes. Serve with pasta and a little grated Parmesan cheese.

To make Lasagne use approximately half the sauce to layer in a casserole dish with Lasagne sheets. Organ’s lasagne sheets work well but make sure they are well covered. Bake at 180C for 40 minutes covered.

Mushroom and Pea Risotto

  • 2 cups arborio rice
  • 300g mushrooms
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 1L chicken stock
  • 1/2 cup white wine
  • Medium leek diced
  • Olive Oil

Risotto is a favourite of mine as there are so many options and its an easy way to increase vegetables in the diet. Saute a leek in olive oil for a few minutes until soft. Add the rice and stir gently for 1-2 minutes. Then add white wine and stir as it absorbs. Add a cup of water and allow it to absorb into the rice. Then add sliced mushrooms and 2 cups of chicken stock. Stir though and allow to absorb. Do not boil rapidly but rather simmer, stirring frequently to stop it sticking to the pan. Gradually add in remaining stock one cup at a time and allowing the rice to absorb. Add in the peas with the last cup of stock.

This recipe usually takes around 40-45 minutes of cooking time. If its nearly finished put the lid on and allow the last bit of stock to be absorbed, after turning off the heat (or moving off the burner).

Serve with a little grated parmesan or diced parsley.

Asian Chicken Noodle Soup

  • 300g cooked chicken breast
  • Rice Noodles
  • 150g mushrooms
  • 200g snow peas
  • 800mL chicken stock
  • 2 Tblesp White Wine Vinegar
  • 2 Tblesp Sesame Oil
  • Soy Sauce

Add white wine vinegar and sesame oil to a large soup pot. Finely slice mushrooms and sauté in oil mix for a few minutes. Add chicken stock and bring to the boil. Meanwhile cook noodles separately by placing in boiling water and leave covered for a few minutes.

Reduce heat to a simmer and add shredded snow peas, chicken and bok choy until chicken is warm. Season with soy sauce. Separate rice noodles and pour soup over and serve. (4 servings)

Christine Pope is recovering from surgery at the moment but is usually practicing at Elemental Health at St Ives.

Five easy lunch salads

One of the best things about finishing school in my view was the end of boring sandwiches for lunch. There is no reason that this needs to be the only option and having a variety of easy salads for lunches can be a good way to improve your child’s diet as well as adding some variety. There are a few salads it’s easy to pack for lunches and if you can add a small ice brick to the lunch box it can be kept cool as well.

What would I recommend ? These are my top 5 for the lunch box.

  1. Easy Chicken Caesar.
  2. Wombok with grilled chicken
  3. Tuna nicoise salad – this is an easy version from Delicious. Roasted potatoes can easily be substituted for the boiled version and add more flavour.
  4. Mexican rice salad
  5. Ham and corn pasta salad – a simple favourite from Taste.com and I usually try and use good quality ham off the bone to give it better flavour.

Easy Chicken Caesar

  • 300g chicken tenders
  • 1 Cos Lettuce
  • 100g proscuitto
  • 2-3 slices of old bread
  • 1/4 cup Aoili mayonaise (or plain mayonaise with 1 clove crushed garlic)

Grill chicken tenders until golden brown and set aside to cool. On a baking tray lightly oiled cook the prosciutto and diced bread at 180C for 8-10 minutes. Prosciutto should be crispy and able to be flaked across the salad. Wash the cos lettuce well and spin dry and then cut into 2 cm slices. Combine lettuce, prosciutto and dressing and serve with grilled chicken and croutons. For the lunch box it may be better to package the croutons separately and add just before eating. (Makes 2 serves).

Wombok with grilled chicken

  • ½ wombok (Chinese) cabbage
  • 2 carrots
  • 1 red capsicum
  • 2 stalks celery or 100g beans sliced
  • 100 g snowpeas or a small can of corn
  • Juice of one lemon
  • Olive Oil (2-3 tblesp)
  • White wine vinegar (1/4 cup)
  • 1 ttblsp each of soy sauce and sesame oil

Cut up finely and toss together. Finely sliced vegetables enhance each others flavour.

Combine the lemon juice, olive oil, soy sauce, sesame oil and white wine vinegar and toss through the salad. The more robust vegetables keep well and you could easily have this as a side with dinner with leftovers for lunch the next day. Just add shredded chicken (150g per person) and make sure you drain well before storing.

Mexican Rice Salad

1 cup cooked rice

1 can of black beans washed and drained

1 small can of corn

1 red capsicum diced

1 punnet cherry tomatoes halved

1 avocado diced

Dressing : 2 Tablespoons of lime juice and 1/4 cup olive oil

Combine ingredients including dressing and mix well.

A nice addition to this recipe is a small bag of corn chips or a tortilla.

Christine Pope is a naturopath and nutritionist based at Elemental Health at St Ives. She typically tries to send her family with leftovers for lunch the next day and it probably works 3 days of the week! Appointments can be made on 8084 0081.