Natural medicine first aid – bruises, sprains and strains

SprainA natural medicine first aid kit is an essential when travelling or on holidays, having key homeopathic medicines means you can deal quickly and easily with a range of minor accidents or illnesses without having to find the local pharmacy.

Common remedies for injuries are Arnica, Hypericum, Rhus tox and Ruta. Often there may be only one or two specific symptoms. It’s a little different to traditional homeopathic prescribing where you often need 4-6 symptoms to accurately prescribe a remedy.

Good additions to a natural medicine first aid kit would also include a Calendula based cream, which is good for treating cut and scrapes and usually helps avoid infections as well as my current favourite, Traumeel gel which has a gentle anti-inflammatory action and absorbs well.

 Arnica

First remedy to consider for falls, sprains or strains, particularly concussion or nosebleeds from an injury. Generally key symptoms are a sore bruised feeling anywhere in the body but with a particular affinity for bruised feeling in the back and sprained ankles. Symptoms are worse for being touched or overexerting themselves and they are better if lying down.

Often the person will want to be left alone and insists that nothing is wrong.

Hypericum

Arnica is a great remedy for soft tissue injuries then Hypericum is its match for injuries to areas rich in nerves. In particular for smashed fingers or toes or a fall on the coccyx. Typically the patient has sharp shooting pains along nerves or radiating upwards from the injury site.  Consider for injuries to areas which are rich in nerves such as fingers and toes. Also very useful where a person has had dental work done.

Symptoms are often better for rubbing the affected area and worse for jarring.

 

Homeopathic medicine.jpgRhus Tox

First remedy to consider for sprained ankles or joints. Stiff joints which are better after they first start moving around – known as the “rusty gate” . Generally people who need Rhus Tox are restless and needs to move around. They feel worse for getting cold or wet and better for warmth.

Can also be useful for chicken pox or shingles or dry hot itchy rashes and for flu where the major symptom is that they are restless and their joints ache.

Rhus tox is usually for busy active good humoured people.

Ruta

Usually if Rhus Tox has not helped a sprain or strain you would then consider Ruta. Injuries to tendons, cartilage or the shins, particularly wrists and ankles. Person feels sore and bruised and they are easily fatigued. Pains are better for moving and warmth.

Generally the person who needs ruta is grumpy and inclined to argue.

Some other useful blogs on first aid remedies are Stomach Aches and Pains and Treating Colds  and Flu naturally and Travelling with a Weak Gut .

Christine Pope is a Naturopath, Homeopath and Nutritionist based at Elemental Health St Ives in Sydney. You can make appointments by phone on 8084 0081 or online at www.elementalhealth.net.au .

5 Tips for good gluten free menu’s

Breakfast at The Conservation Hut

 Australia Day we added a couple of days leave creating a long weekend and headed up to the Blue Mountains. Being strictly gluten free I did some research before I left and came up with an impressive list of options. Unfortunately the definition of gluten free varied widely. So here are some tips for aspiring cafes and restaurants.
1. Having gluten free bread available is nice but it doesn’t make for gluten free options . We particularly enjoyed the gluten free high tea at the Hydro Majestic because we got to enjoy lots of delicious options which were all gluten free. They even toasted the bread which is essential when you are dealing with gluten free bread. A particular highlight was a raspberry macaroon served with fresh raspberries. Just wish they could sort out the gluten free scones – there are some great options around and they are an essential part of a high tea. Also just remember if you do provide gluten free bread then be careful about cross contamination with food handling.

2. Provide real gluten free options. At Anonymous Cafe at Blackheath the gluten free breakfast options included gluten free toast, spiced pumpkin loaf and a gluten free muesli. The spiced pumpkin loaf was served with marscopone and jam and was a delicious option.

Gluten free at the Hydro Majestic

3. Remember people who are gluten free often have multiple intolerances including dairy and egg so ideally include options which don’t double down on the intolerances. Great breakfast options could include adding a vegetable hash with optional inclusions such as salmon, egg or bacon. The Conservation Hut at Wentworth Falls offered a smoked trout hash with a poached egg and was happy to leave it off when requested.

4. Educate your staff about your menu’s. At one restaurant which will not be named I was asked by one waitress whether potatoes were gluten free? She then advised that only two of the main courses were options but subsequently a different staff member then told me that everything could be made gluten free. This was a bit misleading as it turned out they removed the portion of the meal that required gluten. For dessert it was actually the crumble part of the peach and apple crumble and it would have been nice to know that half the dessert would not be included. Its so easy to make gluten free crumble mix – any mix of almond meal, brown sugar, quinoa or rice flakes would work well.

By contrast we also enjoyed dinner at Vesta‘s in Blackhealth where the waitress not only could tell you what was possible in terms of gluten free but provided options such as flaxseed crisp to enjoy with the pate on the charcuterie board. The small board made a good sized entree between two people and included a pate and a terrine as well as some meats and excellent pickled vegetables.

5. Mark the menu with the gluten free and other options, such as vegetarian. This means when you search menu’s its easy to see if there are real gluten free options and quickly identify what they are. The Ori Cafe at Springwood and Papadino’s at Katoomba both have well marked menu’s with a good range of options. The night we ate at Papadino’s the specials board even included a gluten free gnocchi. It was served with a Napolitana sauce which was quite garlicky but also delicious.

Christine Pope is a Nutritionist and Homeopath who practices at Elemental Health at St Ives. If you need help managing food intolerances or just some good restaurant recommendations you can make an appointment on 8084 0081 or book online .